July 29, 2014

theartofgooglebooks:

Neon moiré.

Throughout Bible Readings for the Home Circle (1888). Original from Princeton University. Digitized March 18, 2008.

July 29, 2014
spideretc:

best new line in new ish RAV 10

spideretc:

best new line in new ish RAV 10

2:30pm
  
Filed under: mickey z 
July 29, 2014

(via notalkingplz)

July 29, 2014
aleyma:

Dragonfly helmet, made in Japan in the 17th century (source).

High-ranking lords began to embellish their helmets with sculptural forms so that they could be visually located on the battlefield. Exotic helmets (kawari kabuto) also allowed leaders to choose symbolic motifs for their helmets that reflected some aspect of their personality or that of their collective battalions. This helmet is shaped like a giant dragonfly. In Japan, the dragonfly is symbolic of focused endeavor and vigilance because of its manner of moving up, down and sideways while continuing to face forward. In addition, in ancient texts Japan was often referred to as Akitsushima (Land of the Dragonflies), because of their abundance. They were also thought to be the spirits of rice, since they are often to be found hovering above the flooded rice fields. - from the Minneapolis Institute of Arts description

aleyma:

Dragonfly helmet, made in Japan in the 17th century (source).

High-ranking lords began to embellish their helmets with sculptural forms so that they could be visually located on the battlefield. Exotic helmets (kawari kabuto) also allowed leaders to choose symbolic motifs for their helmets that reflected some aspect of their personality or that of their collective battalions. This helmet is shaped like a giant dragonfly. In Japan, the dragonfly is symbolic of focused endeavor and vigilance because of its manner of moving up, down and sideways while continuing to face forward. In addition, in ancient texts Japan was often referred to as Akitsushima (Land of the Dragonflies), because of their abundance. They were also thought to be the spirits of rice, since they are often to be found hovering above the flooded rice fields. - from the Minneapolis Institute of Arts description

(via anielathehun)

July 28, 2014

(Source: moonmonkey, via lastgreatpoolparty)

4:10pm
  
Filed under: gpoy 
July 28, 2014
oldbookillustrations:

Numerous furred animals.
Jules Férat, from The fur country, by Jules Verne, Boston, 1874.
(Source: archive.org)

oldbookillustrations:

Numerous furred animals.

Jules Férat, from The fur country, by Jules Verne, Boston, 1874.

(Source: archive.org)

July 28, 2014

lindahall:

Elizabeth Gould - Scientist of the Day

Elizabeth Gould, an English artist, was born July 18, 1804. In 1829, she married John Gould, an up-and-coming ornithologist, and Elizabeth immediately became the official family draughtswoman, finishing John’s rough drawings and executing the lithographs for the Century of Birds from the Himalaya Mountains (1830-32), and The Birds of Europe (1833-37). Although John gave Elizabeth full artistic credit in the Century, he became increasingly reluctant to share the limelight in later publications, so that, for example, Elizabeth receives almost no acknowledgement in the bird volume of Darwin’s Zoology of the Beagle (1841), although she did all the drawings and lithographs.

Elizabeth went to Australia with John in 1838 (leaving her 3 youngest children behind) and spent two years there, capturing the local birds and mammals on paper. John and Elizabeth returned to England in 1840, but sadly, Elizabeth died of puerperal fever in 1841, after giving birth to their eighth child. She was only 37 years old. All of her Australian paintings were lithographed and eventually published in such volumes as The Mammals of Australia (1863), but she received no credit at all for these posthumous publications.

The images show the crimson horned pheasant from Century of Birds, the blue roller from Birds of Europe, and the cactus finch from the Zoology of the Beagle,as well as a portrait of Elizabeth in a private collection.

Elizabeth was one of 12 women artists featured in the Library’s 2005 exhibition, Women’s Work. All of the volumes mentioned here are in the Library’s History of Science Collection.

Dr. William B. Ashworth, Jr., Consultant for the History of Science, Linda Hall Library and Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Missouri-Kansas City

(Source: lhldigital.lindahall.org, via scientificillustration)

July 28, 2014
erikkwakkel:

Funny rabbits
I just encountered this clever and amusing image in a French database of medieval manuscripts. It shows three rabbits running in circles - with shared ears. There is nothing much to this drawing from a book-historical point of view, except to say that it has an Escher-feel to it. In fact, I am not even sure what it means to convey. I am simply sharing it here because the ear entanglement is so cleverly done - and the whole scene brought a big smile to my face.
Pic: Arras, Bibliothèque municipale, MS 7 (13th century).
Note: Various followers on Tumblr and Twitter pointed out parallels of these three hares, both in western and eastern art. This Wikepedia offers more information (link provided by this and this follower).

erikkwakkel:

Funny rabbits

I just encountered this clever and amusing image in a French database of medieval manuscripts. It shows three rabbits running in circles - with shared ears. There is nothing much to this drawing from a book-historical point of view, except to say that it has an Escher-feel to it. In fact, I am not even sure what it means to convey. I am simply sharing it here because the ear entanglement is so cleverly done - and the whole scene brought a big smile to my face.

Pic: Arras, Bibliothèque municipale, MS 7 (13th century).

Note: Various followers on Tumblr and Twitter pointed out parallels of these three hares, both in western and eastern art. This Wikepedia offers more information (link provided by this and this follower).

1:40pm
  
Filed under: tinner's hares 
July 28, 2014
socimages:

Celery: The food of the rich and famous, circa 1900.
These are not fancy glasses. 
They’re celery vases and they’re exactly what they sound like: vases for celery.   In the late 1800s, people used these vases to ostentatiously present celery to their guests. Celery, you see, was a status food: a rare delicacy that only wealthy families could afford and, therefore, a way to demonstrate your importance to guests.
As celery began to decline in importance — cheaper varieties became available and its role for the elite declined — celery vases were replaced by celery dishes.   “Less conspicuous on the dining table,” writes decorative arts consultant Walter Richie, “the celery dish reflected the diminishing importance of celery.”

Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the co-author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

socimages:

Celery: The food of the rich and famous, circa 1900.

These are not fancy glasses. 

They’re celery vases and they’re exactly what they sound like: vases for celery.   In the late 1800s, people used these vases to ostentatiously present celery to their guests. Celery, you see, was a status food: a rare delicacy that only wealthy families could afford and, therefore, a way to demonstrate your importance to guests.

As celery began to decline in importance — cheaper varieties became available and its role for the elite declined — celery vases were replaced by celery dishes.   “Less conspicuous on the dining table,” writes decorative arts consultant Walter Richie, “the celery dish reflected the diminishing importance of celery.”

1a

Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the co-author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

(via craftastrophies)

July 25, 2014

heresthatrainyday:

Some more pages from my Golden Guides! These things had so many cool facts. Each are 160 pages.

In order of appearance: Reptiles & Amphibians, Stars, Exotic Plants for Home and Garden, Hallucinogenic Plants, Non-Flowering Plants, Zoo Animals, Venomous Animals, Endangered Animals, Bats of the World, and Rocks and Minerals.

(via scientificillustration)

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