February 18, 2014

V0038808 Credit: Wellcome Library, London Two young boys have caught a cuttlefish and brought it home for their aquarium. The women are shocked, some crabs have escaped from a bucket, one is attacking the dog. Wood engraving by P. Swain. Published: [s.n.][S.l.] : Size: image 12.3 x 20 cm. Collection: Iconographic Collections Library reference no.: ICV No 39365 Full Bibliographic Record Link to Wellcome Library Catalogue Copyrighted work available under Creative Commons Attribution only licence CC BY 2.0, see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/ 

V0038808 Credit: Wellcome Library, London 
Two young boys have caught a cuttlefish and brought it home for their aquarium. The women are shocked, some crabs have escaped from a bucket, one is attacking the dog. Wood engraving by P. Swain. 
Published: [s.n.][S.l.] : 
Size: image 12.3 x 20 cm. 
Collection: Iconographic Collections 
Library reference no.: ICV No 39365 
Full Bibliographic Record Link to Wellcome Library Catalogue 

Copyrighted work available under Creative Commons Attribution only licence CC BY 2.0, see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/ 

(Source: cuttlefisharemypals, via scientificillustration)

12:50pm
  
Filed under: horrors of the deep 
November 17, 2013

nevver:

Vladimir Stankovic

(via scientificillustration)

4:11pm
  
Filed under: horrors of the deep 
October 22, 2013

workman:

iamjapanese:

Alessandro Nocentini(Italian, b.1949)

La Razza    2002   tecnica mista su carta intelata

Calamaro   2007   acquerello su carta

La seppia   2010    acquerello su carta

Trota e trota

(via scientificillustration)

2:30pm
  
Filed under: horrors of the deep 
September 18, 2013
cumaeansibyl:

kleenexwoman:

ANGLERFISH MERMAID OH MY FUCKING GOD

she looks like an illustration from a 1970s beauty product ad and I am so here for that

cumaeansibyl:

kleenexwoman:

ANGLERFISH MERMAID OH MY FUCKING GOD

she looks like an illustration from a 1970s beauty product ad and I am so here for that

(Source: humungus, via sulienapgwien)

September 12, 2013
via Agence Eureka

via Agence Eureka

September 2, 2013

odditiesoflife:

The Terrifying Mouths of the Sea

1) The Shark Goblin

Considered a living fossil, the rare goblin shark lives deep in the ocean. It’s the only living representative of the Mitsukurinidae family, a lineage that goes back about 125 million years. Adults grow to about 10 to 13 feet long and feature a long flattened snout and highly protrusile jaws. Its long snout is covered with a specialized organ that enable it to sense minute electric fields produced by nearby prey, which it then snatches up by rapidly extending and snapping its horrendous-looking jaws.

2) Hag Fish

In response to physical attack, the hagfish secretes a microfibrous slime. When this goo is combined with water it expands into a cohesive, gelatinous muck (picture 4). A few drops of this stuff is sufficient to bind water dozens of times its own volume and, unlike a simple slime, the proteins it contains unravel to give it some tensile strength and durability. Why the horrifying teeth?

3) The Leatherback Sea Turtle

Those hundreds of jagged stalactites that line the turtle’s mouth and esophagus all the way down to its horrible, horrible gut are called papillae, and they exist because the leatherback turtle’s diet consists entirely of jellyfish and other soft-bodied, slimy invertebrates.

4) The Vampire Fish

Local to the Amazon, the vampire fish is packing a mouth full of knives designed to shank other fish. The teeth are so long - up to 6 inches - that it has to sheathe them in a holster built into the front of its face. They are closely related to piranhas, and piranhas also constitute most of their diet.

5) The Cookie Cutter Shark

Appearing only in deep water under cover of night, the cookie cutter shark is only 2 feet long, but it has the largest teeth relative to its size of any shark. As small as it is, the cookie cutter prefers to inflict hit-and-run attacks. As its name suggests, its signature move is to use the razor-sharp cookie cutter built into its face to quickly rip a circular chunk out of its prey.

sources 1, 2

(via renleigh)

2:30pm
  
Filed under: horrors of the deep 
August 19, 2013

laphamsquarterly:

NEW LQ PODCAST!

Floating around the margins and swimming through the middle of maps between the eighth and sixteenth centuries was a whole aquarium of magical, fantastical sea monsters.

Chet Van Duzer makes the introductions to all these various leviathans, sirens, mermaids, and sea serpents, who inhabit the pages of his book, Sea Monsters on Medieval and Renaissance Maps

(via LQ Podcast 44: Monsters of the Deep - Lapham’s Quarterly)

4:10pm
  
Filed under: horrors of the deep 
January 25, 2013

biomedicalephemera:

Artistic interpretations of sea life, birds, and reptiles

Between the beginning of the Scientific Revolution (which began in the mid-17th century) and the early-19th Century movement towards dry and clinical accuracy in both anatomical and zoological illustrations, there was a period of extravagance, showiness, and artistic expression in the sciences.

Instead of being solely geared towards other scientists, the artists sought to entice the general public and show off their vast collections, in many of their works. This can be seen in the medical illustrations of Frederick Ruysch, as well as here, in the zoological illustrations of Albertus Seba.

[h/t to Biodiversity Library’s blog for tipping me off to the interesting connections between two collections already in my archive]

Locupletissimi rerum naturalium thesauri accurata descripto, tome II & III. Albetus Seba, 1735.

2:30pm
  
Filed under: horrors of the deep 
January 14, 2013
scientificillustration:

Crustacea by BioDivLibrary on Flickr.
The Zoology of the voyage of H.M.S. Samarang, under the command of Captain Sir Edward Belcher, C.B., F.R.A.S., F.G.S., during the years 1843-1846 /.London :Reeve and Benham,1850 [i.e. 1848-1850].biodiversitylibrary.org/page/39771176

scientificillustration:

Crustacea by BioDivLibrary on Flickr.

The Zoology of the voyage of H.M.S. Samarang, under the command of Captain Sir Edward Belcher, C.B., F.R.A.S., F.G.S., during the years 1843-1846 /.
London :Reeve and Benham,1850 [i.e. 1848-1850].
biodiversitylibrary.org/page/39771176

1:40pm
  
Filed under: horrors of the deep 
December 18, 2012
via 50 Watts

via 50 Watts

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